What to expect on an oncology unit?

An inpatient oncology unit has patients at various stages of cancer diagnosis and treatment. They may be newly diagnosed and given a shock, which requires information about their options and emotional support to cope with the diagnosis.

What to expect on an oncology unit?

An inpatient oncology unit has patients at various stages of cancer diagnosis and treatment. They may be newly diagnosed and given a shock, which requires information about their options and emotional support to cope with the diagnosis. May be hospitalized for chemotherapy or chemotherapy side effects. Diagnosing and treating cancer is complex.

People often need the experience and skills of several different medical and health professionals to treat cancer. These professionals involved in caring for a patient's cancer make up the oncology team. This can also be called a cancer care team, health care team, or multidisciplinary care team. The roles of the cancer nurse can range from specializing in bone marrow transplants to focusing on cancer screening, screening, and prevention in the community.

Outpatient cancer clinics can include patient care at all stages of their journey, from referral to new oncology visits, where nurses can take health records and perform labs. Meet with an oncologist, a doctor who specializes in the study, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer. Cancer patients often know more medical jargon than the average patient, but between the “mental fog” that often accompanies chemotherapy and fatigue, oncology nurses must make an emphatic effort to confirm that the patient understands what is happening to their health. Oncology nurses can help ease patients' pain and nausea and help implement the treatment plan that is best for the patient.

While this may vary by employer, nurses in outpatient clinics generally work 8- or 9-hour shifts, while those working on oncology floors often work 12-hour shifts with fewer “on” days to balance it out. Oncology nurses play a key role in helping patients and caregivers overcome and overcome the disease, often forming lasting bonds that continue for years after the last treatment. Another option would be to create experience in an oncology floor as a certified nursing assistant before or during nursing school. The pathologist will determine the results of the tests, provide the final diagnosis of the cancer, and work directly with the oncologists.

The palliative care team works closely with other members of the oncology team to prevent and treat the symptoms and side effects of cancer and its treatment. Nurses are specially trained through the Oncology Nursing Society to have the knowledge and experience in caring for patients who experience the complex problems that can be associated with cancer. Oncology nursing in a hospital can be very demanding, but nurses on the floor have the privilege of helping to relieve patients' pain and help them go through a difficult time. Because cancer patients generally spend more time in the hospital and nurses spend most of their time with patients, the relationships you build with them will be special.

I remember a young cancer nurse who once accompanied her patient on the ambulance ride home after her shift ended. Ultimately, the oncologist wants to provide patients with the right resources and treatments to overcome the disease and enjoy a successful recovery. Oncology nurses are often the ones who provide consistent information and guidance throughout the treatment plan. .

Bettie Duford
Bettie Duford

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